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Centre For Deccan Studies

Regional studies in Indian have not received the importance they deserve either before or after independence. The Indian universities have concentrated on teaching, while research in the social sciences has largely been neglected, except insofar as individual scholars have chosen to undertake research in the fields of their choice. One reason for this is the lack of an inter-disciplinary and policy-oriented approach.

There is an urgent need to make available to policy-makers a comprehensive body of knowledge to enable them to choose one of the several alternatives policies to which they are exposed. More.. Journal: Deccan Studies Subscription: An inter-disciplinary Bi-annual Journal The annual subscription is: Deccan Studies is intended to help scholars, working on any aspect of the Deccan, to gain access to source materials and exposure to the scholarly world in India and abroad.

It also provides factual articles on the contribution of individuals and institutions to the study of Deccan (Andhra Pradesh, Goa, Karnataka and Maharashtra). Though the publication has started in 2002, only one issue was brought out in 2002 and also in 2003. From 2004 onwards two issues (January-June and July-December) are being published regularly every year.

Category Indian Foriegn Individuals Rs. 250 US $ 25 (2/3 years: Rs. 500 / 750) (2/3 years: US $ 50 / 75) Institutions Rs.300 US $ 40 (2/3 years: Rs. 600 / 900) (2/3 years: US $ 80 / 120) Subscriptions are accepted on a calendar year basis only.Subscriptions for two/three years are also welcome. Foreign subscribers could pay in US dollars or the equivalent amount in dollars

  • Journal
Journal An inter-disciplinary Bi-annual Journal From Centre for Deccan Studies Deccan Studies is intended to help scholars, working on any aspect of the Deccan, to gain access to source materials and exposure to the scholarly world in India and abroad. It also provides factual articles on the contribution of individuals and institutions to the study of Deccan (Andhra Pradesh, Goa, Karnataka and Maharashtra).

Though the publication has started in 2002, only one issue was brought out in 2002 and also in 2003. From 2004 onwards two issues (January-June and July-December) are being published regularly every year.

Our Editorial Board

Chairman: V.K. Bawa Executive Editor (Designate): H. Rajendra Prasad Associate Editor: Vinod K. Jairath Members: Aloka Parasher-Sen, K.Paddayya, D.P. Joshi M.A., Nayeem, A.Satyanarayana, DusanDeak, Scott Kugle, Harpreet Singh, Sajjad Shahid Editorial Advisory Board: R.E. Frykenberg, Karen B. Leonard, Richard Eaton, V.V. Krishna Sastry, Jagdish Mittal , Phillip B. Wagoner, M.R.K. Sarma, Daud Ali, K. V. Narayana Rao A)

Guidelines for Contributors:

Articles for publication should be neatly typed, double-spaced with wide margins, on one side of A4 size paper. Please submit two printed copies of the articles, and a computer diskette, if possible (IBM-formatted with MS Word preferred). A hard copy is essential. The length of the article should be between 2,500 and 4,000 words. The length should not exceed 4,000 words. If the article has diacritical marks, please send it on a computer diskette since we do not have types with diacritical marks. For referencing, we prefer the author-date system, rather than footnotes/endnotes.

For example: Sherwani 1974: 91, 123-126; 1980: 25-27; Sherwani and Joshi 1974: 226-228. A list of references giving full publication details is to be provided at the end, including author’s name, year of publication, title, place of publication and publisher. (For more details, please see the Chicago Manual of Style.)

Please keep illustrations and photos to a minimum. They normally should be reducible to fit in the print area of the page (10 x 18 cms), along with the caption. Captions may be typed or clearly hand-written at the back/bottom of the photos. Please number the illustrations and photos and correlate them with the text. B) Additional Items to be send: Please submit a synopsis of the article of about 150 words and bio-data of the contributor (with e-mail address) in not more than 60 words.

Contributors are requested to provide both their postal and e-mail address to facilitate communication.

Address: CENTRE FOR DECCAN STUDIES, Shanti Bagh, 703/3, Road No.12, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034 (AP) INDIA. C) Procedure : All contributions will be peer-reviewed and copy- edited. No significant changes will be made by us without referring to the contributor. Two copies of the issue in which the article is published will be mailed to the contributor

  • Editorial Board

Deccan Studies Editorial Board

Chairman : V.k.Bawa

Executive Editor (Designate) : H.Rajendra Prasad

Associate Editor : Vinod K.Jairath

Members Aloka Prarasher-Sen

K.Paddayya

D.P.Joshi

M.A.Nayeem

A.Satyanarayana

Rahamat Yousuf Zai

Dusan Deak

Scott Kugle

Harpreet Singh

Sajjad Shahid

Ismat Mehdi

Editorial Advisory Board

R.E.Frykenberg

K.Karen

Leonard Richard Eaton

V.V.Krishna Sastry

Jagdish Mittal

Phillip B.Wagoner

M.R.K Sarma

Daud Ali

K.V.Narayana Rao

Narendra Luther

  • Guidelines for Contributors

A) Guidelines for Contributors:

Articles for publication should be neatly typed, double-spaced with wide margins, on one side of A4 size paper.

Please submit two printed copies of the articles, and email, if possible (IBM-formatted with MS Word preferred). A hard copy is essential.

The length of the article should be between 2,500 and 4,000 words. The length should not exceed 4,000 words. If the article has diacritical marks, please send it on a computer diskette since we do not have types with diacritical marks.

For referencing, we prefer the author-date system, rather than footnotes/endnotes. For example: Sherwani 1974: 91, 123-126; 1980: 25-27; Sherwani and Joshi 1974: 226-228.

A list of references giving full publication details is to be provided at the end, including author’s name, year of publication, title, place of publication and publisher. (For more details, please see the Chicago Manual of Style.)

Please keep illustrations and photos to a minimum. They normally should be reducible to fit in the print area of the page (10 x 18 cms), along with the caption.

Captions may be typed or clearly hand-written at the back/bottom of the photos. Please number the illustrations and photos and correlate them with the text.

B) Additional Items to be sent:

Please submit a synopsis of the article of about 150 words and bio-data of the contributor (with e-mail address) in not more than 60 words. Contributors are requested to provide both their postal and e-mail address to facilitate communication.

Address: CENTRE FOR DECCAN STUDIES, Shanti Bagh, 703/3, Road No.12, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034 (AP) INDIA.

C) Procedure :

All contributions will be peer-reviewed and copy- edited. No significant changes will be made by us without referring to the contributor. Two copies of the issue in which the article is published will be mailed to the contributor

  • Deccan Studies Journal Subscription

Subscription: The annual subscription is: Category Indian Foriegn Individuals Rs. 250 US $ 25 (2/3 years: Rs. 500 / 750) (2/3 years: US $ 50 / 75) Institutions Rs.300 US $ 40 (2/3 years: Rs. 600 / 900) (2/3 years: US $ 80 / 120)

Subscriptions are accepted on a calendar year basis only.

Subscriptions for two/three years are also welcome. Foreign subscribers can pay in US dollars or the equivalent amount in Euros, Yens, Marks, Australian dollars. Subscriptions can be paid by money order or Demand Draft drawn in favour of Deccan Studies on any bank payable at Hyderabad. Bank collection charges:

If you are paying by cheque for a subscription copy to an Indian address, please add Rs. 60. If you are paying by cheque for a copy to be sent outside India, please add US $ 2 or equivalent. Back Issues Contents From Volume I, Number 1 (January-June 2002)

Subscription order from can be downloaded from here:

Founder Membership/Life Subscriber:

Well-wishers of the Centre for Deccan Studies and its Journal, Deccan Studies, are invited to contribute to the success of the Journal by enrolling themselves as Founder Members / Life Subscribers of the Journal.

Book Reviews/Notes:

Two copies of books for review should be sent. A short review of the books received will be given in the Book Notes pages. Two copies of the issue of Deccan Studies, in which the review appears, will be sent to the publishers.

Advertisements:

Advertisements from publishers, booksellers, academic institutions and other well-wishers are welcome. Tariff: Back cover Rs. 7,000 Full page Rs. 5,000 Inner cover Rs. 3,500 Online Ad – Please Contact deccanstudies@gmail.com (in black and white, print size 10 x 19 cms, single insertion) Correspondence: Correspondence on all matters relating to articles for publication, books for review, subscription, change of address, sales, and advertisements, should be sent to:

The Editor, Deccan Studies Shanti Bagh, 703/3,

Road No.12, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034 (AP) INDIA.

  • Executive Members

Centre for Deccan Studies Executive Committee Members

Dr. V. K. BAWA

DR. H. RAJENDRA PRASAD

Sri SAJJAD SHAHID

Sri ALI BILGRAMI

Sri HARI HARAN

Founder Members

LATE PROF AR KULKARNI

Dr. S.U. KAMATH,

BENGALURU

Dr. P.P. SHIRODKAR,

GOA

Dr. M. NAIMUDDIN,

HYDERABAD

PROF NEELAMBAR HATTI,

LUND

PROF JAMES WARNER BJORKMAN,

THE HAGUE

LATE PROF ISAAC SEQUEIRA

LATE PROF SYED SIRAJUDDIN

Donor Members

LATE SRI ABID ALI KHAN, HYDERABAD

SRI M. V. GHORPADE, BANGALORE

  • Contact Deccan Studies

Contact CENTRE FOR DECCAN STUDIES

Shanti Bagh, 703/3,

Road No.12, Banjara Hills,

Hyderabad 500 034

Telangana,  INDIA.

emailid : deccanstudies@gmail.com

  • The Publication

Publication

When the last great Mughal ruler, Aurangzeb, died in 1707, the Mughal rulers controlled about two third of India. The Viceroyalty of the Deccan with its capital at Aurangabad controlled in theory the whole of Southern India. However, during the next hundred years, the British became the masters of India. Under British rule, approximately one third of India was under Indian rulers Maharajas with their jeweled turbans were often seen in elite drawing rooms and at race courses in England.

The Seventh Nizam of Hyderabad, Mir Osman Ali Khan, ruled the major Indian state from 1911 till the Indian government entered the state under Operation Polo in September 1948. He continued to head the state as Rajpramukh after the introduction of the Indian Constitution in 1950. The recent revival of the demand for the creation of a Telangana state, in fact harks back to a recommendation of the States Reorganization Commission of 1956. This recommendation was not implemented only because of a Gentleman’s Agreement adopted by the leaders of the two Telugu speaking regions, one of which earlier formed part of Madras Presidency under British rule.

Although the agrarian Telangana revolt of the 1940’s had played a role in uniting the peoples of the two Telugu- speaking regions, its impact was clearly short-lived. The problem erupted again in the late 1960’s and has again occupied centrestage in 2009-10. The Nizam had a tendency to interfere in the administration of the State. One of the members of his own Executive Council described him as the “Leader of the Opposition” to his own government. It was only after the decisive British intervention of 1926, when they insisted on the appointment of several key officials of their choice, that the administration reached a high level of efficiency.

In 1918 a new University with the Urdu language as the medium was set up. The Irrigation and Cooperative Departments, the Railway and bus systems, the urban water supply and the City Improvement Board, the Deccan Radio and the Deccan Airways achieved a high level of efficiency. Outside experts like Sir M Visvesvaraya enhanced the standards of local government in the city of Hyderabad . Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, made several visits to Hyderabad in the thirties and forties, and had a say in political decisionmaking. He gained considerable leverage from the Nizam’s support while the latter gained nothing.

The Nizam’s attempts to build up an international identity was of no avail after British power had withdrawn totally from the subcontinent. The Nizam had to accept a position of subservience while some of his former officials and many of his former subject rose to high positions in the Indian Union, and a few elsewhere.

Extracts from Book Review in the Journal of Deccan Studies Vol-IX, No 1, Jan-Jun:2011 ”This magisterial work is the most contextualized, meticulous and thorough history of a single Nizam and his Dominions–also known as Hyderabad State–so far produced. Substantially revised and expanded, by over 160 pages, with a group of thirty-eight glossy photographs (portraits of successive Nizams, historic buildings and monuments, banquets, conferences, durbars, processions and other notable images), this truly should adorn the library of any person seriously interested in the history of modern India. India’s largest princely state rested upon foundations laid by the Qutb Shahi rulers of Golkonda in 1518. It was they who founded the new City of Hyderabad in 1591.

After the Mughal Padshah Aurangzeb conquered Golkonda in 1687, Nizam ul Mulk Asaf Jah and his successors had carved out and consolidated enormous territories in the Deccan. By 1800, “subsidiary treaties” gradually had brought the Nizam’s Dominions under the rising imperial sway of the Company’s Raj. Mir Osman Ali Khan (1886-1967), the Seventh Nizam of Hyderabad, can be seen as a transitional figure. His reign lay directly athwart medieval and modern India. Between the rule of his “legendary” father whom he succeeded in 1911 and the “Police Action” of 1948 that ended his rule lay vastly different realities. His father, as the “Shadow of God” and “Mighty Holder of Destinies”, ruled over millions. Osman himself never quite comprehended what dwelling in this last “twilight of the Mughals” entailed. However personally gifted and upright he was, he was never allowed, even as a schoolboy, to mingle with ordinary mortals. As a consequence, he never acquired a balanced sense of political realities, either of India or of the world beyond.

He could never see that the centre of the universe was not located in King Kothi–and that he himself was not its ultimate “huzur” (divine presence). Already an authority on Salar Jang I (1823-1883), Hyderabad’s greatest prime minister, Dr. V. K. (Vasant Kumar) Bawa has produced a monumental epic. In abundant detail, and with penetrating insights, he has treated readers to a narrative of bright colours and stark contrasts, of occasional growth and gradual decay. This is more than the story of a single person–the Last Nizam–or even of his vast and complex dominions. It is a story of India itself. Larger contexts and frameworks swirl around the perspectives of a single person and his royal court, as also around his dynamic city at the heart of the Deccan. This metropolis expanded and thrived, despite struggles of abject and poverty-stricken peasantry in villages of a vast, surrounding countryside. Villages seemed hardly to receive more than passing notice from the parasitic nobility and their largely oblivious Mughal overlord. This absolute overlord, with his supplicant underlords, in their “little kingdoms”, was overtaken by events in the world outside of Hyderabad State.

Two world wars came and went. Independence movements spread throughout India. The Nizam was overwhelmed by rising tumults within his own domains. During his reign, what had once been remarkably inclusive and tolerant multicultural gentry began to disintegrate; and what might have become a healthy common or civil society among its peoples failed to develop. This failure was accompanied by growing, hitherto unknown, tides of communal unrest. Agitations of the Arya Samaj, Hindu Mahasabha, and Sanathana Dharm were countered, in turn, by agitations of the Majlis Tablighi-i-Islam and the Majlis Ittchadul-Muslimeen. These were followed by the atrocities and violence of Razakar extremists and, finally, by the Communist-led agrarian revolt of the Telengana movement. In the vortex of these swirling tides, the Nizam vainly tried to control events. His blundered badly and, almost unavoidably, he failed to preserve the independence of his dominions.”

Robert Eric Frykenberg Professor Emeritus of History & South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

About The Author

Dr. Vasant Kumar Bawa was born in Punjab in 1930. He was educated in Poona and was a Fulbright scholar in the United States during the early 1950’s. In 1967 he was awarded a doctorate in Political Science by Tulane University in New Orleans. Dr Bawa served in the Andhra Pradesh cadre of the Indian Administrative Service from 1954 till 1980. and is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the quarterly World Affairs of New Delhi. .

He is the Chairman of the Editorial Board of the journal Deccan Studies. His biography of a major Hyderabad figure, the nineteenth century Diwan, Salar Jang I, was first published in 1986. Its second edition was published in 1996, The present study carries the history of the Nizams on to the twentieth century and the ending of the state of Hyderabad.

Dr Bawa has published several books in the fields of modern Indian history and international affairs. He has also published scholarly articles in well-known academic journals,

  • Center for Deccan studies

Creation of a robust research and resource centre through collection, documentation and study of historical, socio-economic, political, cultural and literary dimensions of and related to the region.

Mission · To encourage collection, restoration and conservation of manuscripts, monographs, books, articles, public and private records about Deccan for study and posterity.

To facilitate research based interdisciplinary studies on the region.

· To help scholars engage in active research on the Deccan through training programs, especially in source languages. · To develop greater professionalism and scientific disposition among academicians, archivists, policy makers and others interested in the history and cultural heritage of the region.

Scope and Objectives

The objectives arise from the vast scope that comes under the purview of the H.K. Sherwani Centre for Deccan Studies. The Centre will adopt a multi-focussed, interdisciplinary approach essential in the present day and will be devoted to the study of the following aspects of the Deccan, placing them in contemporary context. · Historical · Geographical · Socio-economic · Religious · Cultural

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